July42014

feliciashanay:

friendly reminder that tons of people, especially black people, use the 4th as a way to celebrate other things in their lives and to connect with family so you can keep all your judgmental ~i’m too enlightened for this~ text posts to yourself.

image

(via gadaboutgreen)

June152014
lookpeople:

thebicker:

insigins:

theatregreek:

The fact that he was never actually outright “rejected” and simply expected girls to just come to him wanting to fuck him makes this even more pathetic.

even more scary too, knowing sickos like these might silently build up anger towards you without you ever doing anything to them or even noticing them

It terrifies me to think of someone becoming enraged just because I, as a woman, exist in his vicinity and am not paying attention to him. The manifesto was rife with examples of times he was sitting in silence and begrudging all the women around him for not throwing themselves at the lonely quiet dude sitting in the corner staring daggers at him. There was one point where he said he was sitting in the cafeteria, not talking to anyone. He said something like, “I didn’t go up to any women because I knew they would reject me. Women are so cruel.”
He didn’t give women an active chance to reject him. They would have been completely justified in doing so, but he didn’t. He didn’t even approach women. He felt like he deserved sex just for existing.
So yeah, no, he wasn’t “rejected by women.” He felt entitled to women despite putting no effort whatsoever (beyond driving a nice car and having nice clothes) into meeting a real human woman.

Yup. I kept waiting to get to the actual rejection in his manifesto and it just isn’t there.

lookpeople:

thebicker:

insigins:

theatregreek:

The fact that he was never actually outright “rejected” and simply expected girls to just come to him wanting to fuck him makes this even more pathetic.

even more scary too, knowing sickos like these might silently build up anger towards you without you ever doing anything to them or even noticing them

It terrifies me to think of someone becoming enraged just because I, as a woman, exist in his vicinity and am not paying attention to him. The manifesto was rife with examples of times he was sitting in silence and begrudging all the women around him for not throwing themselves at the lonely quiet dude sitting in the corner staring daggers at him. There was one point where he said he was sitting in the cafeteria, not talking to anyone. He said something like, “I didn’t go up to any women because I knew they would reject me. Women are so cruel.”

He didn’t give women an active chance to reject him. They would have been completely justified in doing so, but he didn’t. He didn’t even approach women. He felt like he deserved sex just for existing.

So yeah, no, he wasn’t “rejected by women.” He felt entitled to women despite putting no effort whatsoever (beyond driving a nice car and having nice clothes) into meeting a real human woman.

Yup. I kept waiting to get to the actual rejection in his manifesto and it just isn’t there.

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

12PM

bramblepatch:

you know, I’ve seen the “one of the cookies has cyanide in it. I’m not going to tell you which. why don’t you want a cookie? not all of them are dangerous” analogy going around and even that’s not quite covering it.

it’s more like

one of these almond cookies has cyanide in it

a lot of the “warning signs” are so culturally ingrained in masculinity that they’re to some degree present even when the individual we’re dealing with isn’t himself dangerous.

We can’t even try to detect the dangerous cookie by detecting the bitter almond scent when you insist on baking almonds into all the safe cookies

June142014

alimarko:

Always remember that women who call themselves feminists will be accused so many times of being man-haters, but when a man kills women just for being women, he is called mentally unwell, and a madman rather than a woman-hater or misogynist. 

(via karlimeaghan)

12PM

(Source: sophiehayes, via gabbyrose)

June132014

Orlando Jones

yourfaveisproblematic:

In an unprecedented move. Orlando Jones has become the first celebrity to ever submit himself to YFIP. Here is his submission:

image

Here is a post he wrote on his own Tumblr with some background and justifications

12PM

How to like problematic things

starvedforjustice:

  • know they’re problematic
  • know why they’re problematic
  • don’t dismiss people’s feelings/dissatisfaction with them
  • don’t silence people when they’re talking about the problems in your media, because your enjoyment is not more important than that discussion. 

(via burdenedwithgloriousbooty)

June122014

hawtistic:

dannyqhantom:

i just had to draw this because i feel like screaming tbh

Yeah but note that unless something like anxiety or a lack of spoons gets in the way, it’s the responsibility of the people not directly affected by the Hurtful Thing to call it out.

Because while it’s jarring to suddenly notice the Hurtful Thing after learning about it, people who have always been its target have never had that luxury. Ever.

12PM

dynamicafrica:

Paintings from the series Power by Nigerian-American artist Dawn Okoro.

(via sugahwaatah)

June112014

(Re)Generating Community: Radical Coalitions at the Intersections

fabianswriting:

from the QSOC Conference at Portland State University, May 10

To those of us you who are living in the margins, outliers, intersections I am here to speak to your urgency. It is not something that can be tamed with any amount of white supremacist internalization. Even in the direst of situations the urgency you have for a different life has been there. It is that urgency that draws me and keeps me connected to my people, to you, you are my people.

The thing about this urgency to create change is that it can turn destructive or isolating. It’s a big thing to carry on our bodies, to feel the history of our people on our skin all the time.

We are not just living the present, we are living the past, we are transhistorical. Our stories and our experiences are consequences of war and genocide, we are survivors and we are not supposed to be here. But this isn’t enough to change things. I do not believe that simply carrying this urgency will mean a greater passion to be there for people whose struggles we do not understand. Yes, we may carry this urgency, and we are multi-marginalized people who also carry privilege and unearned benefits also as a result of colonization and oppression.

I don’t think it’s enough to use our urgency to wage movements that solely benefit us. We need to continue to look at the outliers of the outliers and work to create a better world for all people, especially those most forgotten; consider that single issue politics and movements work in alignment with capitalism and all forms of oppression. Because systems of power are about exclusion. Oftentimes these movements utilize all collective energy towards creating legislative changes, to create new laws. And while I support the passing of some laws in order to make things a little better for a little longer, it’s not enough.

Andrea Smith warns us that pushing solely for legislative changes compromises our goals since those in power often coopt social justice movements. They did this with the feminist movement that pushed for legislative changes to reduce domestic violence and sex trafficking. Although new laws were passed nationally under the guise of protection for women, so were longer sentences, dual arrest laws for the survivor and perpetrator. Ultimately we ended up with laws that justified longer sentences for brown and black people, more prisons and little progress in reducing domestic violence. What was closely discussed by the majority white women that organized this movement was what will happen if we advocate for the protection from cops? Who will be impacted the most?

Immigrant reform is another movement that has been coopted by those in power who seek to create a good type of immigrant and a bad one, or the “illegals.”  Again this movement has been used to fuel the most profitable of all incarceration business, with GEO making $120 a night per immigrant that is incarcerated. Whenever I visit the detention center that is located in Tacoma, WA I hear about the people inside who do not fit the ideal of the good immigrant, they are not students, they are poor, most do not speak English. And if you were to look at who is being deported you will not be surprised that these are people who cannot afford legal help, whose stories do not appeal to the media who want exceptionally sensationalized stories. Even here the many ways we try to humanize immigrants fails us because not all immigrants have traditional family structures, some are the first to arrive and have no one to advocate for them, not all have clean records or any type of skill that is considered worthy in classist ideals.

When you leave this conference and want to build coalition think of the people who are are often forgotten considered or most undesirable. This means rethinking our reliance on punitive structures including the prison industrial complex and all forms of shame. In social justice circles I have heard many people talk about and promote prison sentences as justice and I feel my heart break over again. Although prisons were initially introduced as a more humane punishment than death for those who committed crimes, they have served to disproportionally lock up black and brown people, folks with disabilities, addiction, any form of undesirable trait.

How do we build coalitions when we are so invested in punishment of ourselves and others? Living in a country that incarcerates millions of people means that we internalize some of the ideals of the carceral state. One way that the carceral system impacts our communities is by the use of disgust and shame for marginalized people. Often times we also carry disgust and shame for our marginalized identities and as Laura Citrin, a faculty at Evergreen State College shares in her research on the psychology of disgust that “disgust is a successful disciplinary because it shames” and “creates and maintains cultural concepts of ‘normal.” In fact disgust is so successful as a disciplinary function of systems of oppression because people often associate their feelings of disgust as personal preferences.

By participating in carceral systems, systems of punishment we make solidarity difficult. How can we be in solidarity with people who we do not value? How can we be in solidarity with people we see as disgusting? How can we be in solidarity with people we avoid because they do not fit ideals of desirability? How can we be in solidarity and work together with people who we do not take seriously?

I believe that solidarity means fostering an urgency for the dismantling of my privileges the same way that I do about my oppression. Because of this I work to learn about anti-blackness, own my Citizen, thin, able bodied and masculine privilege. I can quote so many black feminist theorists and have used their words to back my arguments. This is common in qpoc spaces to hear Audrey Lorde, bell hooks, June Jordan. And I ask you, I ask us who are not black to not play into selective reading, hear, acting by dismissing their calls for us, non-black people of color to take their voices seriously when they speak about anti-blackness. I hope that we can take our willingness that willingness to quote these black scholars to fuel our solidarity with black communities.

Also I agree with Junot Diaz that as long as we hold onto systems of attraction things will stay the same. Systems are attraction are the internalization of systems of oppression that determine who we as a society, as groups determine who is desirable, worthy of visibility, worthy of attention. People who fit multiple areas of desirability are deemed the leaders and most visible of the queer community. This means that it is no mistake that I am up here talking to you all, that I know that my thin body, light skin and lack of accent play a huge part into being accepted as a leader. I know it is no mistake that I had to work twice as hard when I was fat to given this type of attention. And I also know that having social capital, cute privilege, pretty privilege, whatever it is that you call it prevents people who have these advantages from receiving the same type of critique as someone who is not cute or has social capital. Ultimately we do have the power to change the way we view desirability. We can raise our own awareness and ask ourselves, why am I attracted to the people that I date? why do I not consider these people attractive? How does this intersect with the privileges I have?

In my urgency, I want movements that prioritize femme people, trans women, trans people of color, two spirit people, Indigenous, fat people, folks with disability, sex trade workers, survivors of sexual violence and create environments where accountability is given more merit than quick forms of discipline or punishment. I want to be in a movement where calling in and and out are both respected and where we acknowledge that the people most punished for calling out others are often times also the ones that must yell in order to be heard. I want accessible spaces that allow vulnerability, because let’s face it in our own spaces we mimic white classist ableist codes of conduct that often times prioritize looking strong over being whole. I believe it is possible to still be powerful in our messy processes and know that it is possible although hard to hold this contradiction. We need this space. I urge you to see your sites of marginalizations as your power outside of systems of power, we are inherently good and to also hold your privileges with the same passion as you do your oppressions.

fabian romero- indigenous immigrant queer boi writer/speaker 

Here is Fabian Romero’s speech from QSoCC 2014! <3

12PM

unobject:

i-am-river:

So, i read this awful article using bathroom “scare tactics,” which was claiming that trans women are potential rapists. “Men” who dress as women to gain access to women only spaces and force them self on women. This really upset me and i had a bit of a Twitter rant. They were read by others and i was urged to post them in other media also, so i am posting them here. (Edited together in easy reading format from top to bottom.)

This is the link in the first tweet about how there are no cases of a trans woman attacking a cis woman in public restrooms: Link 1.

This is the link in the second tweet about the cases where trans people are assaulted in the bathroom by cis people: Link 2.

re blogging this because truth and and same, BUT ALSO b/c i just realized this is why i have had so many uti’s (urinary tract infections) and why its become less frequent. Like, I used to just buy cranberry juice in advance knowing I’d get another one soon enough.

I literally can not believe it took this long to put this together as the obvious correlation 

I once got a UTI from lack of safe bathroom access, and I am also fat, so I didn’t want to go to the doctor (because yay! dehumanisation!), and I hoped cranberry juice would clear it up, and instead I got a kidney infection and had a 2+ day 104 degree fever so bad I couldn’t stay awake and started hallucinating, and missed a week of classes and had to take awful antibiotics and threw up a lot and could barely eat.

Bathroom safety is a big deal, y’all.

(via burdenedwithgloriousbooty)

June102014

lolnaaaahbruh:

locksandglasses:

When people try to equate “cracker” with “nigger” to prove the existence of reverse racism.

welp

(via thishandsomefemme)

12PM

wheeliewifee:

Introducing our NEW “Queer as in Fuck You” collection!

Featuring:
• choose your preferred pronouns stamped disc necklace or keychain (custom options available)

https://www.etsy.com/listing/187416426/hand-stamped-preferred-pronouns-necklace

“queer as in fuck you” stamped disc necklace or keychain

https://www.etsy.com/listing/187415470/hand-stamped-queer-as-in-f-you-necklace

• “pronouns matter” stamped disc necklace or keychain

https://www.etsy.com/listing/187415166/hand-stamped-pronouns-matter-necklace-or

• “ask me about my pronouns” stamped disc necklace or keychain

https://www.etsy.com/listing/187414996/hand-stamped-ask-me-about-me-pronouns

visit my little shop here, and please reblog!
https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThePaperPoppyStore

I’d love to reach as many people who may need/want these kind of pieces as possible, so signal boosting is greatly appreciated!

And since I know that queer folks (like my husband and I) are far more likely to be in poverty, let me know if you need a coupon code, or even if you’d like to barter ;) we’ll do what we can!

(via lunalacelove)

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